HOW TO MAKE .GIFS IN PHOTOSHOP CS6*, THE EASY WAY, SINCE MAKING CAPS IS TOO MUCH WORK, IN TEN EASY STEPS.
*this also works in CS4 and CS5, but CS6 is definitely the most seamless and reliable for .gif making this way to date, imo
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Step One: Open up your video file in Photoshop. If you don’t have the timeline toolbar open already, go to WINDOW>Timeline to open it up. It should look like this:
 
STEP TWO: Isolate the parts of the vide you want to make the .gif out of. Do this by taking the circled parts and pulling them into so they surround only the part of the video you want.
NOTE: You want to zoom in on the timeline by clicking the big mountain:  
It will be easier to isolate the exact part that you want if zoom in on it. CS6 makes this a lot easier than previous versions because when you put this thingy: 
on the part where you want it to end, and pull the ending slider to it, it will automatically snap to it. The same as if you put that thingy where you want it to start and pull the first slider to that part, it will snap to it. (Also, a tip, you can use these to jump back and forth by frame to get the exact part you want  they will move the thingy either back and forth and then you can snap to it like mentioned above)
Once you have isolated the part of the video you want, you can press the play button (the triangle thing) and make sure that is the .gif you want to make. 
My timeline now looks like this: 

STEP THREE: Once you have isolated the part of the video you want to make a .gif of, you can apply your coloring. Just make the coloring straight on it or drag your .psd layers over like you would do with any other image. 
My work area now looks like this:

STEP FOUR: Troubleshooting the last step. Press play on your .gif. Does your coloring seem to go through your whole .gif and not blink or skip? If your answer is yes, skip this step and go onto the next one. If your answer is no, you fucked up. Just kidding. Well, you did, but it’s fixable. The issue is some of your layers didn’t apply to the whole part of the .gif. This happens to me a lot and I think it has something to do with where you time marker thingy is why you drag your layers over or put them onto the .gif. No fear, I figured this shit out ages ago.  Notice how the part with the arrow pointed to it is a little bit off from where the markers for the .gif begin? This is where the issue is. That layer is only being applied to part of the .gif, instead of the whole .gif. What you wanna do is go to the purple part and pull the edges out so it covers the whole of your .gif, do this with any part that seems to be not covering your whole .gif. (If your layers are in groups, you’re going to need to need to open the group up and do the same thing) It should now look something like this (it doesn’t matter how far you pull out the purple things, as long as it covers the whole part of the gif you are trying to make)

Your coloring should be done at this point.
STEP FIVE: I usually will resize at this point. In the case of this .gif, I just went to Image>Image Size and set the width to 500px. After that I’ll usually sharpen the .gif. Go to your layers panel and click your first layer, which should be the video. Sharpen how you would anything else. Nothing too hard here.
STEP SIX: Play your .gif to make sure it is how you want it. If you are satisfied with it, go to FILE>EXPORT>Render Video. A pop up will show up with settings. This is what mine looks like: 
Name it whatever you like and put it some place you can find it, then click Render. 
STEP SEVEN: Go to FILE>IMPORT>Video Frames to Layers. Navigate to where you saved the last file and open that. This will pop up: 
You’re going to want to change the “Limit To Every _ Frames” part to either 2-5. I usually stick to 3 frames. Choose what suits your .gif best. Since this is a really short .gif, I chose 3 frames. For longer .gifs you can get away with 5 frames. I’ve gotten away with doing 8 frames without skipping by also speeding up the gif, but that’s really usually unnecessary. Stick to 2-5. Press okay.
STEP EIGHT: A new document should have popped up. Your timeline should look something like this: 
If you notice, the frame rate is at .04 seconds, which is way too fast. Pick whatever works for your .gif, but I usually stick to .15 secs. Click the arrow next to the “0.04 sec” to change your frame rate. 
STEP NINE: Press play to make sure your .gif is how you want it. I’m satisfied with mine so it’s time to save. Go to FILE>Save for Web. Something similar to this will pop up: 
The top image is your original, and the bottom is the optimization for web. These are my settings for this .gif. MAKE SURE YOUR LOOPING OPTIONS ARE SET TO FOREVER. Your .gif will only play once if it isn’t set to forever.
If your .gif is more than 1000K you want to click this:  
A dialogue will pop up, and in that click “OPTIMIZE TO FILE SIZE” another dialogue will pop up, change your settings to this and press OK:

STEP TEN: Click save and save your .gif to your desired destination. At this point, you should have a finished .gif. In just ten easy steps.

HOW TO MAKE .GIFS IN PHOTOSHOP CS6*, THE EASY WAY, SINCE MAKING CAPS IS TOO MUCH WORK, IN TEN EASY STEPS.

*this also works in CS4 and CS5, but CS6 is definitely the most seamless and reliable for .gif making this way to date, imo

Step One: Open up your video file in Photoshop. If you don’t have the timeline toolbar open already, go to WINDOW>Timeline to open it up. It should look like this:

 

STEP TWO: Isolate the parts of the vide you want to make the .gif out of. Do this by taking the circled parts and pulling them into so they surround only the part of the video you want.

NOTE: You want to zoom in on the timeline by clicking the big mountain:  

It will be easier to isolate the exact part that you want if zoom in on it. CS6 makes this a lot easier than previous versions because when you put this thingy: 

on the part where you want it to end, and pull the ending slider to it, it will automatically snap to it. The same as if you put that thingy where you want it to start and pull the first slider to that part, it will snap to it. (Also, a tip, you can use these to jump back and forth by frame to get the exact part you want  they will move the thingy either back and forth and then you can snap to it like mentioned above)

Once you have isolated the part of the video you want, you can press the play button (the triangle thing) and make sure that is the .gif you want to make. 

My timeline now looks like this: 

STEP THREE: Once you have isolated the part of the video you want to make a .gif of, you can apply your coloring. Just make the coloring straight on it or drag your .psd layers over like you would do with any other image. 

My work area now looks like this:

STEP FOUR: Troubleshooting the last step. Press play on your .gif. Does your coloring seem to go through your whole .gif and not blink or skip? If your answer is yes, skip this step and go onto the next one. If your answer is no, you fucked up. Just kidding. Well, you did, but it’s fixable. The issue is some of your layers didn’t apply to the whole part of the .gif. This happens to me a lot and I think it has something to do with where you time marker thingy is why you drag your layers over or put them onto the .gif. No fear, I figured this shit out ages ago.  Notice how the part with the arrow pointed to it is a little bit off from where the markers for the .gif begin? This is where the issue is. That layer is only being applied to part of the .gif, instead of the whole .gif. What you wanna do is go to the purple part and pull the edges out so it covers the whole of your .gif, do this with any part that seems to be not covering your whole .gif. (If your layers are in groups, you’re going to need to need to open the group up and do the same thing) It should now look something like this (it doesn’t matter how far you pull out the purple things, as long as it covers the whole part of the gif you are trying to make)

Your coloring should be done at this point.

STEP FIVE: I usually will resize at this point. In the case of this .gif, I just went to Image>Image Size and set the width to 500px. After that I’ll usually sharpen the .gif. Go to your layers panel and click your first layer, which should be the video. Sharpen how you would anything else. Nothing too hard here.

STEP SIX: Play your .gif to make sure it is how you want it. If you are satisfied with it, go to FILE>EXPORT>Render Video. A pop up will show up with settings. This is what mine looks like: 

Name it whatever you like and put it some place you can find it, then click Render. 

STEP SEVEN: Go to FILE>IMPORT>Video Frames to Layers. Navigate to where you saved the last file and open that. This will pop up: 

You’re going to want to change the “Limit To Every _ Frames” part to either 2-5. I usually stick to 3 frames. Choose what suits your .gif best. Since this is a really short .gif, I chose 3 frames. For longer .gifs you can get away with 5 frames. I’ve gotten away with doing 8 frames without skipping by also speeding up the gif, but that’s really usually unnecessary. Stick to 2-5. Press okay.

STEP EIGHT: A new document should have popped up. Your timeline should look something like this: 

If you notice, the frame rate is at .04 seconds, which is way too fast. Pick whatever works for your .gif, but I usually stick to .15 secs. Click the arrow next to the “0.04 sec” to change your frame rate. 

STEP NINE: Press play to make sure your .gif is how you want it. I’m satisfied with mine so it’s time to save. Go to FILE>Save for Web. Something similar to this will pop up: 

The top image is your original, and the bottom is the optimization for web. These are my settings for this .gif. MAKE SURE YOUR LOOPING OPTIONS ARE SET TO FOREVER. Your .gif will only play once if it isn’t set to forever.

If your .gif is more than 1000K you want to click this:  

A dialogue will pop up, and in that click “OPTIMIZE TO FILE SIZE” another dialogue will pop up, change your settings to this and press OK:


STEP TEN: 
Click save and save your .gif to your desired destination. At this point, you should have a finished .gif. In just ten easy steps.

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