do you mind giving a tutorial on this? /post/32626335907

It’s really pretty easy actually.

  1. Take your cap or image or whatever. Crop it/resize it. Mine is 500x650. 
  2. Apply your coloring. I’d give you mind but I’m still using the .psd on other graphics and I like to hoard my own coloring until I get tired of using it. Plus it will have your original touches this way~
  3. Select all (CMND+A, i don’t know windows commands I’m assuming it is CTRL), copy merged (CMND+shift+C), paste (CMND+V). This is just copying the merged and placing it on top of all the layers.
  4. Add a Gaussian Blur to that layer. I think I used a radius of 3 pixels. Depends on the image, really.
  5. Take a grainy texture (black background with white grain is what I used) and put it on top of all the layers on screen. I like northerndawn's grain textures. I think I used primarily ones from the 9th set, specifically #14 in that set. Use a layer mask on the texture layer to erase parts that don't look right if you need to. Lower the opacity, duplicate, etc.
  6. Take black text and arrange it however you like. I used the font Frontage for “Raggedy Man” and Lavenderia for “Goodbye” If you want it to line up, use rulers to help you. (here’s a tutorial on rulers and guides.) Set the text layers to Soft Light. 
  7. That’s it!
sherlocks:

Texture Set #2: I’m not really sure how useful these will be to other people, but I figured I’d might as well post them. I find them most useful to add color with a bit more depth than a typical color fill would do. I tend to use them on Soft Light to add a subtle color change or make things look less flat.
30 Textures, 600x700
Download: mediafire // BOX

Updated mediafire links and added a box mirror to both my texture sets! Sorry that mediafire decided to be rude.

sherlocks:

Texture Set #2: I’m not really sure how useful these will be to other people, but I figured I’d might as well post them. I find them most useful to add color with a bit more depth than a typical color fill would do. I tend to use them on Soft Light to add a subtle color change or make things look less flat.

30 Textures, 600x700

Download: mediafire // BOX

Updated mediafire links and added a box mirror to both my texture sets! Sorry that mediafire decided to be rude.

RE: MY TEXTURES

(SORRY TO THE WHOEVER I JUST REPLIED TO I DIDN’T MEAN TO REPLY PRIVATELY.)

Regarding my textures, I don’t have the files on this computer so I can’t reupload them (since mediafire deleted it even though they are the least offensive files on my account) and my school blocks downloading websites (where my computer w/ the files is) it might be a few days until I get get it back up again. Unless anyone has the files and wants to upload them for me so I can reupload them, it’ll be a couple days or up to a week until I can put it back up again.

what's the difference between sharpening a picture normally and sharpening on a merged layer?

I guess it depends on the picture, sometimes it won’t make a difference but other times it will. I always sharpen at the end, so that makes a bit of difference. if you sharpen on the merged layer when you have textures or light layers (vignettes or what have you like my “glow” tutorial) it will look different than if you sharpen just the base. it depends on how you want it to look, really. i tend to try both, depending on what effect i want. things with tons of textures tend to look better when you merge them and sharpen, but edits that are just images it doesn’t really make a difference! 

i oversharpened this just for explanation sake, but you can see the difference between here:

where I just sharpened the base (so the top part where it’s mostly texture isn’t sharpened in this case)

and here where I sharpened the merged.

Hey did you lighten the layers / erase some portion to make the layers overlap like that on your teen wolf photoset? :)

i’m gonna assume you already know how to make .gifs and such and go from there! this is kind of hard to explain so hopefully it makes sense.

basically, you make the two .gifs how you normally would and have them in their own separate documents. i’m just gonna reference the stiles .gif for the sake of explaining easier since i did them all the same. i had a .gif of Stiles on one doc, and a .gif of his dad in another doc. 

at that point, i took the layers from the .gif of his dad and dragged them into the Stiles document. to make it easier, i put those layers into a group (just select them all in the layers panel and drag them to the icon in the layers panel that looks like a folder). once you do that, select all your frames in the animation/timeline workspace (to make sure the following change effects all the frames) and change the blending mode of the group you made to screen.  my layers on the .gif now look like this:

once you do that, you should see a nice blend on it. it doesn’t work for everything and sometimes you’re going to have to use a layer mask on the group to erase some parts (which i’ve done) but that’s the basic idea.

 at this point, your second .gif shouldn’t be moving yet since you haven’t turned on all the layers properly. so when you press play to preview the .gif you’re just going to see the frozen frame of - for example - Stiles’s Dad. 

(note: when i say “turned off/turned on” i mean the visibility. so click the eye thing haha) to fix that, you’re going to turn one layer on at a time, one frame at a time. it’s a bit convoluted and i don’t think there’s any other easy way to do it. start by making sure all of the layers are turned off within the group you made. do that by selecting all of the frames in the timeline, then going to the group of layers and turn off any of them that are turned on (the group as a whole is turned on but the layers inside are turned off) after you’ve done that, go to the first frame and click it. then go to the first layer of your group and turn that on. then go to the second frame and click it, and turn the second layer on. keep doing that until you’re done with your frames/layers.

and that’s it! hopefully that makes sense? it’s hard to explain 

could you maybe share your topaz clean settings? they look fantastic and not too harsh? thank you in advance.
Anonymous

Yup, sure.

Most times I’ll fade it out by going edit>fade (or shift command f). It depends on the image, but sometimes I fade it up to 90%. mostly cos I don’t really like the topaz look in general but it gets rid of a lot of jpg pixelization better than any other tool. After my coloring and such like 85% of the time I will put a merged copy on top of all the layers and just sharpen (and then probably lower the opacity depending)

So yeah, that’s it!

Texture Set #2: I’m not really sure how useful these will be to other people, but I figured I’d might as well post them. I find them most useful to add color with a bit more depth than a typical color fill would do. I tend to use them on Soft Light to add a subtle color change or make things look less flat.
30 Textures, 600x700
Download: mediafire // BOX

Texture Set #2: I’m not really sure how useful these will be to other people, but I figured I’d might as well post them. I find them most useful to add color with a bit more depth than a typical color fill would do. I tend to use them on Soft Light to add a subtle color change or make things look less flat.

30 Textures, 600x700

Download: mediafire // BOX

TUTORIAL: How to create this weird glowy effect or whatever it is that I started doing by accident, requested by swordstark
[[MORE]]
STEP ONE: Get your image. Crop it and whatever you wanna do to it. I suggest not sharpening until after, but it’s up to you.

Apply your coloring. It works the same with different colorings, I think. But let’s just go off mine to make it more easier. Here’s the .psd. As you can see it’s a bit darker than the finished project. 

This is good. You want to make sure that your coloring is a bit darker than what you would normally use, because you’re going to be brightening it up otherwise. Just a bit darker. I usually just take the points on the curves layer and move them down a bit. 

STEP TWO: Select all (command+a, ctrl+a on windows, or select>select all), copy merged (command+shift+c, I don’t know the windows command specifically but it’s probably ctrl+shift+c, or edit>copy merged), paste that at the top of your layers. 

STEP THREE: Change the blending mode of that layer to screen. Then go to filter>Gaussian Blur. I usually use 6.5 for my blur, but you can use more or less. Experiment and see what works for you.


STEP FOUR: As you can see, that makes some parts way too bright. I don’t like how that looks at all, so I add a layer mask to the screen layer. If you don’t know how to add a layer mask, just click this:


STEP FIVE: This is the part where it gets more complicated and harder to explain. And I already wrote it out once, and then Chrome quit and now I have to do it again. 
So basically, what you’re going to do is make sure you have default colors for your bg/fg. Get the default colors by pressing D on your keyboard. Make sure black is in your foreground right now. Go to your brush tool. I usually start with a 50-60px brush, 0% hardness, set to 50-60% opacity. It really depends on your image but this is a general way.

Start by going over the face and the places that are super dark. I think Karen’s face is too bright, so I went over that as well as her body. I won’t touch the background in most cases.
It looks like this at this point:


STEP SIX: I’m not fully satisfied with it at this point, as I think some areas lost their glow and aren’t as bright as I want them to be, and some areas are still too bright. Change your foreground color to white (press x if it is your background color) and at this point, I’ll usually lower my brush opacity a little bit (probably to 30-45%) and then go over the places that I think need more glow. Usually I’ll keep eyes and lips darker, while brightening up the cheeks and forehead. I don’t usually do much too the background, unless it is super bright, and then I’ll use the layer mask on it a little bit. I tend to like to do the edges of the hair/head, and keep the hair closer to the face dark. At this point it’s really trial and error, using black and white on the layer mask (basically black=subtract, white=add), to darken some areas and brighten some areas. I try to keep my brush a medium size, don’t make it the same size as the image or else it’s going to do too much. Same with the brush opacity, if you put it at 100% it’s not going to look right. I know this seems like a lot of text, but it’s really hard to explain, I guess. Basically, by the end of it, my layer mask looked like this:

And here’s what it looks like:

STEP SEVEN: At this point, you should be satisfied with the “glow” of your image. Just keep working on the layer mask until you are. Usually I will go back to the base coloring and mess with those layers if I’m not completely satisfied with my coloring, because it will subtly change things, but this isn’t necessary. 
After all this, I’ll copy the merged again and sharpen. I think it looks better to sharpen after because it helps the glow become more defined.


It’s really a matter of using the layer mask to the advantage and not letting the screen layer overtake everything. 
Here’s some other examples with their layer mask:

As you can see, the layer mask is basically random back and forth with black and white brush and that’s what creates the effect.

If you have questions you can ask me, I won’t bite.

TUTORIAL: How to create this weird glowy effect or whatever it is that I started doing by accident, requested by swordstark

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HOW TO MAKE .GIFS IN PHOTOSHOP CS6*, THE EASY WAY, SINCE MAKING CAPS IS TOO MUCH WORK, IN TEN EASY STEPS.
*this also works in CS4 and CS5, but CS6 is definitely the most seamless and reliable for .gif making this way to date, imo
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Step One: Open up your video file in Photoshop. If you don’t have the timeline toolbar open already, go to WINDOW>Timeline to open it up. It should look like this:
 
STEP TWO: Isolate the parts of the vide you want to make the .gif out of. Do this by taking the circled parts and pulling them into so they surround only the part of the video you want.
NOTE: You want to zoom in on the timeline by clicking the big mountain:  
It will be easier to isolate the exact part that you want if zoom in on it. CS6 makes this a lot easier than previous versions because when you put this thingy: 
on the part where you want it to end, and pull the ending slider to it, it will automatically snap to it. The same as if you put that thingy where you want it to start and pull the first slider to that part, it will snap to it. (Also, a tip, you can use these to jump back and forth by frame to get the exact part you want  they will move the thingy either back and forth and then you can snap to it like mentioned above)
Once you have isolated the part of the video you want, you can press the play button (the triangle thing) and make sure that is the .gif you want to make. 
My timeline now looks like this: 

STEP THREE: Once you have isolated the part of the video you want to make a .gif of, you can apply your coloring. Just make the coloring straight on it or drag your .psd layers over like you would do with any other image. 
My work area now looks like this:

STEP FOUR: Troubleshooting the last step. Press play on your .gif. Does your coloring seem to go through your whole .gif and not blink or skip? If your answer is yes, skip this step and go onto the next one. If your answer is no, you fucked up. Just kidding. Well, you did, but it’s fixable. The issue is some of your layers didn’t apply to the whole part of the .gif. This happens to me a lot and I think it has something to do with where you time marker thingy is why you drag your layers over or put them onto the .gif. No fear, I figured this shit out ages ago.  Notice how the part with the arrow pointed to it is a little bit off from where the markers for the .gif begin? This is where the issue is. That layer is only being applied to part of the .gif, instead of the whole .gif. What you wanna do is go to the purple part and pull the edges out so it covers the whole of your .gif, do this with any part that seems to be not covering your whole .gif. (If your layers are in groups, you’re going to need to need to open the group up and do the same thing) It should now look something like this (it doesn’t matter how far you pull out the purple things, as long as it covers the whole part of the gif you are trying to make)

Your coloring should be done at this point.
STEP FIVE: I usually will resize at this point. In the case of this .gif, I just went to Image>Image Size and set the width to 500px. After that I’ll usually sharpen the .gif. Go to your layers panel and click your first layer, which should be the video. Sharpen how you would anything else. Nothing too hard here.
STEP SIX: Play your .gif to make sure it is how you want it. If you are satisfied with it, go to FILE>EXPORT>Render Video. A pop up will show up with settings. This is what mine looks like: 
Name it whatever you like and put it some place you can find it, then click Render. 
STEP SEVEN: Go to FILE>IMPORT>Video Frames to Layers. Navigate to where you saved the last file and open that. This will pop up: 
You’re going to want to change the “Limit To Every _ Frames” part to either 2-5. I usually stick to 3 frames. Choose what suits your .gif best. Since this is a really short .gif, I chose 3 frames. For longer .gifs you can get away with 5 frames. I’ve gotten away with doing 8 frames without skipping by also speeding up the gif, but that’s really usually unnecessary. Stick to 2-5. Press okay.
STEP EIGHT: A new document should have popped up. Your timeline should look something like this: 
If you notice, the frame rate is at .04 seconds, which is way too fast. Pick whatever works for your .gif, but I usually stick to .15 secs. Click the arrow next to the “0.04 sec” to change your frame rate. 
STEP NINE: Press play to make sure your .gif is how you want it. I’m satisfied with mine so it’s time to save. Go to FILE>Save for Web. Something similar to this will pop up: 
The top image is your original, and the bottom is the optimization for web. These are my settings for this .gif. MAKE SURE YOUR LOOPING OPTIONS ARE SET TO FOREVER. Your .gif will only play once if it isn’t set to forever.
If your .gif is more than 1000K you want to click this:  
A dialogue will pop up, and in that click “OPTIMIZE TO FILE SIZE” another dialogue will pop up, change your settings to this and press OK:

STEP TEN: Click save and save your .gif to your desired destination. At this point, you should have a finished .gif. In just ten easy steps.

HOW TO MAKE .GIFS IN PHOTOSHOP CS6*, THE EASY WAY, SINCE MAKING CAPS IS TOO MUCH WORK, IN TEN EASY STEPS.

*this also works in CS4 and CS5, but CS6 is definitely the most seamless and reliable for .gif making this way to date, imo

Read More